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April when water demand was low and the district could shut down 50 percent of the plant. As a result, MWH implemented a detailed sequential plan to accomplish all upgrades without disrupting the delivery of high-quality potable water. City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe County, N.M. A CH2M HILL/Western Summit Constructors Joint Venture completed the Buckman Direct Diversion Project in Santa Fe three months ahead of schedule. The $195 million design-build project diverts, treats and distributes water from the Rio Grande, including 11 miles of raw water pipeline, a new 15 MGD water treatment plant and 15 miles of finished water pipelines. The treatment process combines membrane filtration, ozone disinfection and granular-activated carbon contactors. The project saved the client approximately $2 million through value-engineering studies and an integrated team approach to design. Following treatment, two additional booster stations deliver treated water to customers through 15 miles of new “finished” water pipelines. Protecting the environment and resolving permitting challenges were key concerns due to the sensitive location of the river intake and crossing of multiple jurisdictions for the pipeline alignments. Spokane County, Wash. Spokane County’s new Regional Water Reclamation Facilit y is operating six months ahead of the scheduled contract deadline and a remarkable $20 million under budget. CH2M HILL designed and built the $173 million flagship facility, which uses stateof-the-art membrane-filtration technology to achieve treatment levels for nutrients that are some of the most stringent in the nation. For example, the water that is discharged into the Spokane River from the facility will have the lowest levels of combined nutrient pollution in the United States. In addition, the new facility will produce Class A reclaimed water for beneficial reuse, such as industrial uses and wetlands restoration. The facility will primarily serve the Spokane Valley area of the county. With the initial capacity to treat up to 8 MGD of wastewater daily, the facility’s capacity can be expanded to 24 MGD to accommodate increasing demand over the next 20 to 50 years. Carroll County, Md. A ECOM prov ided permitting, design services and construction for a $28 million expansion of the Freedom Sources: Doug Herbst, MW H Constructors; Mark Alpert, CH2M HILL Constructors; Dave Herer, AECOM; Spokane County website pEtEr hUGhES rEtIrED aS vIcE prESIDEnt anD chIEf coUnSEL of ch2M hILL conStrUctorS, Inc. hE IS noW E XEcUtIvE DIrEctor of thE WatEr DESIGnBUILD coUncIL anD contInUES to pr actIcE L aW In DEnvEr WIth a focUS on LarGE InDUStrIaL anD InfraStrUctUrE proJEctS. dbia.org / W/WW REPORT spring//2012 19 District water-treatment plant. The new 4 MGD W TP augments the count y’s existing plant, increasing its total capacity to 7 MGD. Treatment technologies address varying seasonal surfacewater quality with a new floating intake assembly, rapid mix, enhanced coagulation, flocculation, dissolved air f lotation clarification, membrane filtration, disinfection, water softening and corrosion control. A finished water pump station and three miles of transmission main were included. The county selected an alternative facility layout that AECOM designed during the procurement process to reduce construction time and save significant capital and operational costs. This design consolidates the WTP’s primary components into one compact structure while upgrading portions of the plant and maintaining f low to customers at all time. By using design-build, the county saved about $3 million and completed the project some months sooner than traditional design-bid-build delivery. Holyoke, Mass. AECOM provided designbuild services for the planning, design, permitting, construction, start-up and testing of wastewater system improvements for the City of Holyoke. The improvements cost $24 million. A key element was the design and construction of a 103 MGD screening and disinfection facility for CSO #9. AECOM designed the wet weather treatment processes to be simple, rugged and dependable for their intermittent duty in response to wet weather events. The project also included a variety of rehabilitation and upgrade services at the city’s wastewater treatment facility. It achieved the consent order goals to significantly reduce CSO overflows to the Connecticut River while maximizing secondary treatment of wastewater through the existing WWTP. The design-build process saved approximately $3 million, and the project was completed a year earlier than scheduled. http://www.dbia.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of IQ Spring 2012: The Conference Issue

IQ Spring 2012: The Conference Issue

IQ Spring 2012: The Conference Issue - (Page C1)
IQ Spring 2012: The Conference Issue - (Page C2)
IQ Spring 2012: The Conference Issue - (Page 1)
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http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g32384_dbia_spring2013
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g30201_dbia_winter2012
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g27498_dbia_iq_fall2012
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g27263_dbia_iq_summer2012
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g27412dbia_iq_spr12
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g24065_dbiaiqwinter11
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g21862_dbia_fall_11
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/dbianxtbook_summer_11
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g18240_dbia_spring2011a
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com