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sTeel//sTATe of The secTor The team worked together to build an access road that was flat enough that the drill rigs could navigate, including a soil nail wall that allowed the team safe access to begin working. “The soil wall acted as stabilization for the hillside while also giving access to create the foundations for the building,” Marusich says. However the road ended up becoming an obstacle once construction began because time and cost restraints dictated that it dead end on site. That meant every truck and piece of equipment had to turn around at the far end of the site; so deliveries had to be monitored closely. “It was very important to have on-time delivery of materials because that was the only way everyone could fit on the site and then get off the road,” Marusich says. Once building construction ramped up, the constraints of such a narrow site and building also became problematic. According to DPR Project Manager Michael Saks, the amount of space available for lay-down and access was extremely limited. But lean construction techniques and strict operational protocols helped DPR keep work flow running relatively smoothly. For example, DPR instituted a rule that no one could bring anything to the site that couldn’t be installed in two days or less. “That gave people room to work and made things safer,” Saks says. “If you overload a floor where people are working, it creates an unsafe environment.” With all of these site constraints, it’s no surprise that executing the bridging documents as specified was an ongoing struggle as the team made its way through construction. Marianne O’Brien, principal in t he San Francisco office of SmithGroup, architect of record for the project, says there was a lot of scrambling to make things work. For instance, the design-build team realized that the original survey was inaccurate just as it was about to land a primary column for the bridge that leads into the building. Had the team not discovered the error, the column would have landed on—and disrupted—the main campus electrical feed. “We quickly redesigned to pull the elevator over 20 feet and redesigned the whole connection loading dock area to avoid that electrical feed,” she says. “The design-build process allowed us to carry design parallel with construction to overcome that problem effectively.” Doors and clearances were another problem in such a narrow building. O’Brien says back-andforth collaboration was essential to overcome them. “We had one set of doors that was problematic and it took two weeks and strategy after strategy to get them to work,” she says. “It went from putting side-lights in to needing to temper the side-light. Then we had to bury that in the wall, and then we had to pull it back. It was just a lot of back and forth like that.” holDIng fIrM “Back and forth” was also a consideration in the significant seismic work that had to be incorporated in case of an earthquake. O’Brien says that because the RMB is balanced on a hillside, the building needs to stay in place and move at the same time. “We had to come up with a way to hold the building down on the uphill side, but allow it to move in all these other directions,” she says. The structural framework includes seismic base isolators to absorb the effects of an earthquake while holding the building in place. O’Brien says that it moves 23 inches in any direction, adding that because the building moves, all of the utility connections and railings have to move as well. “The railings are on pivots on both ends, and they’re able to pivot in and out and accommodate movement, so even those connections stay intact. All the utility feeds should stay intact. The building should see virtually no damage,” she says. It’s creative solutions such as those that O’Brien says were integral to the success of a project with many unusual challenges and constraints. “The one thing I never heard on this project was, ‘That’s a silly idea. We can’t do that,’” she says. “Because no matter how ridiculous an idea might seem initially, it almost always led to a solution somewhere along the line. That spirit of innovation and collaboration was the key to making the whole building work.” paUL a aNDrUSS IS a cINcINNatI-Ba SeD WrIter WhoSe Work haS appeareD IN DeLIVer , the MaGazINe of the USpS; MarketING NeWS, the MaGazINe of the aMerIcaN MarketING aSSocIatIoN; aND otherS. She Wrote aBoUt the ScrIppS protoN therapY ceNter IN the faLL 2011 ISSUe of IQ . 16 winter//2011 the quarterly publication of the design-build institute of america

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of IQ Winter 2011: Annual Awards Issue

IQ Winter 2011: Annual Awards Issue

IQ Winter 2011: Annual Awards Issue - (Page C1)
IQ Winter 2011: Annual Awards Issue - (Page C2)
IQ Winter 2011: Annual Awards Issue - (Page 1)
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http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g32384_dbia_spring2013
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g30201_dbia_winter2012
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g27498_dbia_iq_fall2012
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g27263_dbia_iq_summer2012
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g27412dbia_iq_spr12
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g24065_dbiaiqwinter11
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g21862_dbia_fall_11
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/dbianxtbook_summer_11
http://staging.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/DBIA/g18240_dbia_spring2011a
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